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​STATES AND INDUSTRY AGREE
TO SHARE CRITICAL SAFETY INFORMATION


MONTRÉAL, 28 September 2010 – ICAO, the United States Department of Transportation, the European Union and the International Air Transport Association today formally agreed to create a Global Safety Information Exchange (GSIE) to help reduce the risk of accidents and improve the overall level of aviation safety worldwide.

“The more effective and widespread sharing of safety information by regulators and industry can help to better identify existing and emerging risks in air transport operations, making it possible to take action before safety issues result in accidents,” said Raymond Benjamin, ICAO Secretary General, following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding by the four parties on establishing the GSIE.
 
While all four bodies currently gather and analyze their own safety information, notably through accident reports and safety audits, this information is not readily accessible to the other parties or to other aviation stakeholders.


The new GSIE framework will identify the information that will be exchanged and establish procedures for sharing the information multilaterally. This will be done in the most efficient and secure manner possible, taking into consideration existing confidentiality legislation and agreements.

ICAO will act as the focal point for coordinating the collection, analysis and exchange of aviation safety information among the members of the GSIE and for disseminating pertinent information to the global aviation community. In addition, criteria will be established to allow additional parties to join the GSIE.

This announcement was made on the opening day of the Organization’s triennial Assembly.

A specialized agency of the United Nations, ICAO was created in 1944 to promote the safe and orderly development of international civil aviation throughout the world. It sets standards and regulations necessary for aviation safety, security, efficiency and regularity, as well as for aviation environmental protection. The Organization serves as the forum for cooperation in all fields of civil aviation among its 190 Contracting States.