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 Programme Overview

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PRELIMINARY as of: 18 January 2016

 

DAY 1 – TUESDAY, 10 MAY 2016

OFFICIAL OPENING

Times TBD

Welcome Remarks

 

 

 

Keynote Speech

 

 

 

Coffee Break

 

UNITING THE COMMUNITY

Regulators, industry, and service providers and bird strike committees all have different responsibilities. However, they all share a common objective of reducing the hazard of bird/wildlife strikes to aircraft. This session will provide a forum for exchanging the various points-of-view.

 

Lunch

  

THE GLOBAL PICTURE

 

Data on bird/wildlife strikes help to better understand the dynamics of the bird/wildlife strike problem. This session will show "where we are" on a global basis and provide statistical analysis of bird/wildlife data in respect of bird strikes and observation and monitoring of bird/wildlife activities. This can reveal trends that will assist the community to recognize areas of concern to be addressed through various means, such as effective wildlife control programmes.

 

Coffee Break

 

REGULATORY FRAMEWORK (Part I)

 

Bird/wildlife strikes are an increasing safety and economic concern that has resulted in hundreds of fatalities and annual losses of over one billion USD to the aviation industry. This session will focus on emphasising the importance of implementing ICAO SARPs and guidance material on wildlife control and reduction, including defining areas where new standards need to be developed. CAAs will have the opportunity to present their national regulatory frameworks and share their challenges and experience.

 

Welcome Reception

 

End of Day 1

 

DAY 2 – WEDNESDAY, 11 MAY 2016

 

REGULATORY FRAMEWORK (Part II)

 

Bird/wildlife strikes are an increasing safety and economic concern that has resulted in hundreds of fatalities and annual losses of over one billion USD to the aviation industry. This session will focus on emphasising the importance of implementing ICAO SARPs and guidance material on wildlife control and reduction, including defining areas where new standards need to be developed. CAAs will have the opportunity to present their national regulatory frameworks and share their challenges and experience.

 

 

Coffee Break

  

 

BEST PRACTICES (Part I)

 

This session will focus on examples of techniques that can be used to deter birds and other wildlife from aerodromes and thus control the wildlife strike risk, such as habitat management and repellent technology. Various stakeholders will have the opportunity to share their best practices in their own reality, taking into consideration that the effort required will vary with the particular situation concerned and the attractiveness of the location compared to the surrounding habitat.

 

Lunch

  

 

BEST PRACTICES (Part II)

 

This session will focus on examples of techniques that can be used to deter birds and other wildlife from aerodromes and thus control the wildlife strike risk, such as habitat management and repellent technology. Various stakeholders will have the opportunity to share their best practices in their own reality, taking into consideration that the effort required will vary with the particular situation concerned and the attractiveness of the location compared to the surrounding habitat.

 

Coffee Break

  

 

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES, FUTURE TRENDS AND RESEARCH

 

There is a variety of existing and new technologies available to predict and detect birds potentially hazardous to aircraft operation and provide information to reduce the risk of the hazards, such technologies and procedures are particularly important in dealing with the significant hazards posed by birds beyond the boundaries of airports (Avian Radar, RPAs, Unmanned Aerial System Approach Ultrasound, predictive and real-time detection, avoidance and dispersal of hazardous birds/wildlife).

 

End of Day 2

 

 

DAY 3 – THURSDAY, 12 MAY 2016  

CAN AIRPORTS DO IT ALONE?

 

The only way to prevent wildlife strikes is through an approach that systematically and proactively involves all stakeholders. To prevent an accident, the approach is used to identify all of the complex, interlinked events that can lead to an accident. Within the system, specific responsibilities are distributed among various stakeholders - responsibilities that are closely linked. As long as all stakeholders fulfil their roles, the system remains intact and safety is ensured.

 

Coffee Break

  

BIRDSTRIKES/WILDLIFE COMMITTEES

 

Annex 14, Volume I requires the wildlife strike hazard on, or in the vicinity of, an aerodrome to be assessed through, among other things, the establishment of national procedures and an ongoing evaluation of wildlife hazards by competent personnel. The establishment of a national committee is ideally suited to addressing this task. Such committees have proven to be popular forums to gain and exchange information on research and development in airport wildlife control, although the composition of a national committee may vary from State to State, includes all stakeholders associated with or interested in the problem. Listening to their voices is important to understand what is working and what is the lesson learnt from various and diverse experiences.

 

Lunch

  

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER - NEXT STEPS

 

Take-home Message

 

  • Increasing of international awareness of wildlife strike threats to aircraft operational safety
  • Strengthening of the implementation of ICAO SARPs requirements and guidance material on wildlife control and reduction
  • Understanding of roles of various existing bird strike committees (BSCs), including the newly established World Bird Strike Association (WBA) and various regional bird strike committees
  • Lesson learnt from the best practices for wildlife management programmes and techniques
  • More knowledge about new technology such as predictive and real-time bird avoidance systems
  • Better ICAO wildlife strike reporting through the new version of the ECCAIRs system

End of Symposium

 

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