STAMP ISSUES RELATED TO ICAO (1978-1983)

 

United Nations : ICAO Safety in the Air

 

Issue date: 12/06/1978

 

     

 

United Nations New York issue.

The text "Safety in the Air" enclosed by diamond shaped multi‑coloured bands against a backdrop of blue sky high above the clouds.

The selvage shows the United Nations logo, with the year of issue (1978) and the English acronym of the Organization (ICAO).

     

 

 

     

 

United Nations Geneva issue.

Two jet airliners passing each other in predetermined flight paths.

The selvage shows the United Nations logo, with the year of issue (1978) and the French acronym of the Organization (OACI).

      

 

 

Full sheet of 50 stamps (5x10) with marginal inscription. Each row of 5 stamps at $0.70 is valued at $3.50; the margin gives the cumulative price of the rows from $3,50 to $35 (with an increment of $3,50). The cost of each row of 5 stamps is indicated in the margin from 3,50, 7,-, 10,50, etc… to 24,50, 28,-, 31,50, 35,-. Some of the values are replaced by the UN emblem with OACI and 1978.

 

Full sheet of 50 stamps (5x10) with marginal inscription. Each row of 5 stamps at $0.80 is valued at $4; the margin gives the cumulative price of the rows from $4 to $40 (with an increment of $4.00). The cost of each row of 5 stamps is indicated in the margin from 4,-, 8,-, 12,-, etc… to 28,-, 32,-, 36,-, 40,-. Some of the values are replaced by the UN emblem with OACI and 1978.

 

Presentation folder of this issue:

 

 

 

 

 

Plate proofs for New York set, pair.

            

 

Plate proofs for Geneva set, lacking orange printing for lower airplanes, margined at bottom with imprints.

 

Die Proofs in issued colors with simulated perforations.

Artist’s drawings of proposed (and not selected) designs:

 

Design  by  Horacio  Alvarez  Boero,  Argentina,  showing  airplane  and

balloon, acrylic on art board

 

Design by Angel Medina Medina, Uruguay

Design by Angel Medina Medina, Uruguay

Design by Olav Mathiesen, Denmark: Pilots in cockpit of airplane

 

 

Design by Michel Banaglia, Switzerland

 

Design by D. Lif, Israel

 

 

Background: The year 1978 celebrated the 75th anniversary of the first engined-powered flight by the Wright Brothers. This occasion prompted the United Nations Postal Administration (UNPA) to issue two sets of stamps (with US and Swiss denominations) to praise ICAO’s achievements over the past three decades.

Over thirty different first day covers were issued with the UN stamps, either officially by the UN or UNPA or by private designers. Several of those covers are shown hereafter; the cachet makers are provided whenever identified.

 

 

UN Official cachet (Open hand and paper aircraft on blue background). Cover designed by Brazilian Artist J.C. Pirralho in a competition organized by the Art Museum of São Paulo; New York stamps and cancel

 

UN Official cachet (Open hand and paper aircraft on blue background). Cover designed by Brazilian Artist J.C. Pirralho in a competition organized by the Art Museum of São Paulo; Geneva stamps and cancel

United Nations Official cachet; combo cancellations

United Nations Postal Administration; Artist Cemalettin Mutver design; Certificate of authenticity signed by Clayton C. Timbrell, Assistant Secretary General, and Ole Hamann, Chief United Nations Postal Administration, on the reverse

 

United Nations Postal Administration; Artist Cemalettin Mutver design; Certificate of authenticity signed by Clayton C. Timbrell, Assistant Secretary General, and Ole Hamann, Chief United Nations Postal Administration, on the reverse

United Nations Postal Administration cover; Artist Tomas Savrda design; Certificate of authenticity signed by Clayton C. Timbrell, Assistant Secretary General, and Ole Hamann, Chief United Nations Postal Administration, on the reverse

United Nations Postal Administration cover; Artist Tomas Savrda design; Certificate of authenticity signed by Clayton C. Timbrell, Assistant Secretary General, and Ole Hamann, Chief United Nations Postal Administration, on the reverse

 

Back of above covers (English text for the New York covers)

Back of above covers (French text for the

Geneva covers)

Issued by the United Nations Postal Administration; Aristocrat cachet; Air Traffic Controller

Issued by the United Nations Postal Administration; Aristocrat cachet;

Groundmarshaller directs jet to gate in night landing

 

First Day Cover overprinted by Webcraft with the current ICAO logo, creating a situation of anachronism

Cachets cachet

ArtCraft cachet with Boeing 747; Black.

Error: The ICAO emblem shown on this FDC is an early-unofficial emblem in use for some time in 1954 and 1955, with longer wings set lower on the globe than on the current emblem.

 

ArtCraft cachet with Boeing 747; Brown.

Error: The ICAO emblem shown on this FDC is an early-unofficial emblem in use for some time in 1954 and 1955, with longer wings set lower on the globe than on the current emblem.

ArtCraft cachet with Boeing 747; Black.

Error: The ICAO emblem shown on this FDC is an early-unofficial emblem in use for some time in 1954 and 1955, with longer wings set lower on the globe than on the current emblem.

 

ArtCraft cachet with Boeing 747; Blue.

Error: The ICAO emblem shown on this FDC is an early-unofficial emblem in use for some time in 1954 and 1955, with longer wings set lower on the globe than on the current emblem.

Artmaster cachet

Colorano Silk cachet; New York cancel, with inscription: PREMIER JOUR D’ÉMISSION / FIRST DAY OF ISSUE; Air Traffic Controller

 

Colorano Silk cachet; Geneva cancel, with inscription: PREMIER JOUR D’ÉMISSION / FIRST DAY OF ISSUE; Groundmarshaller and the signal Move Ahead

 

Charles Lindbergh picture

Fleetwood cachet (13-cent); Original painting by Fred Labitzke; Reverse of FDC contains historical background text with significance of stamps

 

Fleetwood cachet (25-cent); Original painting by Fred Labitzke; Reverse of FDC contains historical background text with significance of stamps

Back of Fleetwood covers, with text on the

significance of the New York stamps

Front of the Medallic FDC (With sterling silver engraved medallion) by the United Nations Postal Administration; Certificate of authenticity on the back signed by Clayton C. Timbrell, Assistant Secretary General, and Ole Hamann, Chief United Nations Postal Administration

 

Back of Medallic FDC (With sterling silver engraved medallion) by the United Nations Postal Administration; Certificate of authenticity signed by Clayton C. Timbrell, Assistant Secretary General, and Ole Hamann, Chief United Nations Postal Administration

Silk cachet; Studio Philatélique G. Marchand, Geneva, Switzerland

First Day Cover by Artopages.

Error on the UN emblem in the cachet: the design still shows the early unofficial UN emblem, which was replaced by the currently-known emblem approved by the UN General Assembly on 7 December 1946.

 

Front the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA) cachet; Aviator Charles Lindbergh

memorial design; Artwork by Chaim Gross in 1976, with painting by Ole Hamann, Denmark

 

Reverse of WFUNA cachet, showing a dedication to Charles A. Lindbergh, and a drawing by Ole Hamann of the Spirit of St. Louis

 

In recognition of Charles A. Lindbergh as a pioneer in civil aviation and in confirmation of his belief in its future, the words of Anne Morrow Lindbergh and the artistry of Ole Hamann from Denmark have been combined on the above cover and lithography to create a meaningful and artistic record of the theme of this stamp issue Safety in the Air. The artwork incorporates a quotation, signed on the plate by Anne Morrow Lindbergh, under a striking painting by Ole Hamann showing a bird in flight, with several shades of blue enhanced by a lighter blue background and a blue lettering.  Ole Hamann was the third Chief, United Nations Postal Administration. The above cover and lithography (numbered 102/1000) were the first WFUNA design ever to feature two contributors, i.e. Anne Morrow Lindbergh and Ole Hamann, and two signatures.

The quotation on the front of the cover is from Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s response on behalf of her late husband, to the presentation of the Edward Warner Award from ICAO in November 1975: The early flyers loved flying for itself – for the freedom and beauty of the sky, the adventure of life in the air … They wanted flying to be safer and faster … My husband believed that aviation would be one of the great forces of the future to bring nations together.