STAMP ISSUES RELATED TO ICAO (1978-1983)

 

Paraguay : 100th Anniversary of Sir Rowland Hill death,

75th Anniversary of civil aviation and Anniversary of ICAO

 

 

Issue date: 11/06/1979

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing Newfoundland’s first air mail stamp Scott #C1 issued on 12 April 1919 further to a surcharge of  Newfoundland Scott #117 (issued on 2 January 1919 to commemorate the Services of Newfoundland Regiment in WW1 during the battle of Gueudecourt) with "FIRST / TRANS- / ATLANTIC / AIR POST/April, 1919".

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

Battle of Gueudecourt (close to Le Transloy, France) took place on 12 October 1916, as part of the Somme battle. More background information on this stamp can be found by clicking on: Double Canadiana.         

 

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing France Scott #C14 (1936) showing the Caudron C-635 Simoun airplane from the Air Bleu Postal services over Paris; the word POSTES is shown under the left wing.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

  

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing Spain Scott #B106 issued on 15 April 1938 to commemorate the Defenders of Madrid.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing an Ecuador’s unlisted stamp (issued on 28 August 1928) which was overprinted (with “ECUADOR”) and surcharged (with “15”) from the Columbian carmine stamp issued in 1925 by the Colombian airline Sociedad Colombo‑Alemana de Transportes Aéreos, SCADTA; it shows a Junkers F13 seaplane over Magdalena River and the Andes.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

SCADTA was authorized to issue and use its own stamps for a period of 10 years, in return of a royalty of 2% of the face value of the stamps to the Colombian Government; this went on until 1931 when the Airmail Administration of the Republic of Colombia was created. SCADTA had also its own post offices in Colombia and undertook the delivery of the airmail to the addressee’s door.

In response to USA’s competition felt in Latin America, SCADTA responded with an unprecedented growth within Colombia between the years 1927 and 1929, and by opening in 1928 a new line between Buenaventura, Colombia to Guayaquil, Ecuador; this was the company’s first regular service beyond its borders. The Ecuador stamp reproduced here was intended for use on the Ecuador flights of SCADTA.

 

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing United States Scott #C3a issued on 13 May 1918 for the re‑opening of the postal service line New York – Philadelphia – Washington; Curtiss Jenny Invert. See footnote 1.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

 

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing Deutsches Reich Michel #IV K issued on 10 June 1912, with the overprint in dark blue "Gelber Hund" (Yellow Dog) and the surcharge of "-‑1M‑-", for mail carried by the airmail plane Gelber Hund; the inverted overprint and surcharge are a rarity. Issued on the same day, the original stamp of 10 pfg is a semi-official air mail stamp to frank mail carried on an experimental flight from Darmstadt to Munich, Bavaria; it is inscribed Erste Deutsche Luftpost am Rhein and shows a pigeon carrying mail.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

On 10 June 1912, Germany issued a set of three airmail stamps to frank mail carried on an experimental flight from Darmstadt to Munich, Bavaria. Germany also overprinted 10,000 of the 10pfg stamps “Gelber Hund” and surcharged them to 1 mark. August Euler's most famous aircraft flying machine is probably No.33 "Gelber Hund" (Yellow Dog). This aircraft carried mail on 10 June 1912 for the first time in Germany, under the eyes of thousands of spectators at Frankfurt airport.

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing Switzerland Scott #C20a issued in 1935 with inverted surcharge "10" and bars in black. The original stamp was issued on 2 February 1932 to commemorate the opening of the International Disarmament Conference (Conference on the Reduction and Limitation of Arms) held in Geneva from 1932-1934 and shows a front view of airplane. Fifty-nine states were represented at this Conference, including Japan, USA and USSR.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

 

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing Brazil private issue of the Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmgH., Friedrichshaven, for the 1930 LZ 127 Zeppelin South-American commercial flight between Brazil and Europe, surcharged on 25 May 1930 with handstamp print of “5” reis. Only 13 stamps were surcharged.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I. Air mail stamp.

Originally three basic values of the Zeppelin series intended for use on the Pan-American Flight were produced, with some additionally overprinted "Graf Zeppelin/U. S. A.". It soon became apparent that there was a shortage of the lower values, particularly the 5,000reis. Therefore 20,000reis values and other Condor stamps were surcharged to meet this shortage. In Parahyba (capital of the province of Parahyba, Brazil), all the 5,000reis stamps had been used, so an order was given to surcharge the 20,000reis stamp with a large "5" hand-stamp. Records show that only 13 stamps were so surcharged with some of them being sold in Parahyba and others forwarded to Recife where they were used.

 

 

 

Stamp-on-stamp reproducing two Paraguayan stamps:

  1. The first was issued on 5 May 1933; the original colour of this stamp was brown;
  2. The second was issued on 13 April 1935, but the colour was changed from the original brown to violet and it was overprinted in black with “1935”.

These stamps were issued in relation to the Graf Zeppelin airship’s flights to South America.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture. Overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I. Air mail stamp.

 

 

 

 

Strip of 7 stamps with two airmail stamps; regular and specimen (meaning MUESTRA) issues (overprinted diagonally on the set at the right-side).

 

 

 

 

Cancelled to Order (CTO).

 

 

 

 

With hand-stamped control number.

Stamps mounted on Borek hingeless album sheet with explanatory notes in German.

 

Stamps mounted on a presentation sheet (Rowland Hill - der Vater der Briefmarke und sein Work) with explanatory notes in German and facsimile signature of Rowland Hill.

 

 

 

Souvenir sheet reproducing Italy Scott #C49 issued on 20 May 1933 for Balbo’s transatlantic Rome‑Chicago flight, in the form of a triptych: Italian flag; King Victor Emmanuel III; Coliseum, Chicago skyscapers and Savoia-Marchetti S.55X aircraft in transatlantic flight. It is overprinted by ICAO emblem surrounded by the text: 75o ANIVERSARIO DE O.A.C.I.

Sir Rowland Hill’s picture; Savoia-Marchetti S.55X marked I0015.

With control number.

MUESTRA (meaning Specimen) is overprinted diagonally on the second sheet.

More background information on this souvenir sheet can be found by clicking on: Montreal Salutes General Balbo.

 

Stamps mounted on Borek hingeless album sheet with explanatory notes in German.

 

First Day Cover with the 9 stamps of this issue.

 

First Day Cover, 9 stamps on 2 covers, with orange frame around Hill’s picture..

 

 

Same as above with missing orange frame around the picture of Rowland Hill (printing error), although some orange spots are visible.

 

Private issue.

 

First Day Cover from the Sumner Collection. The Sumner Collection in two large vinyl albums (15” by 12”) commemorated the 1840 postal reforms by Sir Rowland Hill and was issued in 1979, the centenary of his death. A total of 102 first day covers from 99 countries around the world was mounted in sleeves on thick blue card pages with comprehensive explanatory English language text.

See footnote 2 about the Paraguayan flag.

 

 

 

 

 

Background: Stamps-on-stamps issue depicting rare stamps of early flights from around the world.

The designer of those stamps included the ICAO emblem, surrounded by 75o Aniversario de OACI. Paraguay inadvertently confused the 75th anniversary of the Wright brothers’ triumph, who made the first successful flight of a manned heavier-than-air vehicle on 17 December 1903, with ICAO which, even today, has not yet reached such a milestone. Furthermore, it should be noted that the date of issuance of this set by Paraguay did not correspond to an anniversary of the first flight (which should have been in 1978) nor to an anniversary celebrated by ICAO. This issue should have more rightly commemorated the 30th anniversary of ICAO (in April 1977), and not its 75th anniversary.

The first seven stamps of this issue were printed in se-tenant strip. The last two values are airmail stamps that were printed in separate sheets. Specimen stamps also exist and are shown here above.

 

Footnote 1: The 24-cent Curtiss Jenny stamp was issued on 13 May 1918 for the inaugural U.S. airmail service, for the rate period beginning 15 May to 13 July 1918; the 24-cent postage included special delivery service.

Since the stamp was printed in two colors, each sheet had to be fed twice through the printing press, an error-prone process, and at least three misprinted sheets were found during the production process and were destroyed. It is believed that only one misprinted sheet of 100 stamps got through unnoticed, and stamp collectors have spent the ensuing years trying to find them all. This most famous error in the history of U.S. stamps highlights the ways a single stamp can turn history upside down.

To honor stamp collecting, on 22 September 2013, the United States Postal Service issued a miniature sheet showing six examples of the stamp denominated $2 each rather than the original 24-cents.

Regular stamp (1913).

Inverted Jenny (1913).

Issue of 22 September 2013.

 

Miniature sheet with 6 stamps issued on 22 September 2013.

 

Footnote 2:

The cachet shows the official flag of the country. The colours of the Paraguayan flag (three equal horizontal bands of red white and blue, with the emblem) were influenced by the French Tricolor flag, which had become a symbol of liberation. The official symbolism of the flag is very rich. To mention only colour symbolism, red stands for patriotism, courage, heroism, equality and justice; white for purity, firmness, union and peace; and blue for tranquillity, love, knowledge, verity and liberty. Centred in the white band of the flag, the coat of arms (a yellow five-pointed star - the Star of May recalls the declaration of independence from Spain on 14 May 1811 - within a green wreath capped by the words REPUBLICA DEL PARAGUAY) is reproduced in the cachet.