STAMP ISSUES RELATED TO ICAO (1984-1985)

 

Isle of Man : 40th Anniversary of ICAO and

50th Anniversary of the first official airmail service to the Isle of Man

 

Issue date: 27/04/1984

 

 

de Havilland D.H.84 Dragon Mk 2 registered G‑ACXI in United Kingdom and operated by Railway Air Services in the mid 1930s. This stamp shows an early view of Ronaldsway Airport, which originally consisted of a 75-acre field.  

 

de Havilland D.H.86A Dragon Express of Blackpool and West Coast Air Services Ltd, over Calf of Man, registered G‑ADVJ in United Kingdom.

 

Douglas DC‑3 of British European Airways (BEA) over Ronaldsway Airport, registered G‑AGZB in United Kingdom. British European Airways held the mail-carrying contract from 1949 to 1963; the DC-3 was one of the earlier planes used.

 

Vickers Viscount 806 of British European Airways (BEA) over Douglas, registered G-APIM in United Kingdom. From  1960, British European Airways used this airplane on the Isle of Man route.

 

Britten-Norman BN-2A-27 Islander of Telair Manchester LTD over Ronaldsway Airport, registered G‑AXXH in United Kingdom. In 1984, mail was conveyed on Norman Islander aircraft operated by Telair.

Presentation folder of this issue. de Havilland D.H.84 Dragon Mk 2 registered G-ACXI operated by Railway Air Services and Britten-Norman BN-2A-27 Islander registered G-AXXH of Telair Manchester LTD.

 

 

 

Gutter pairs.

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upper-right Corner block of 4, with control number.

 

 

 

 

Aerogramme with Douglas cancellation.

de Havilland D.H.84 Dragon Mk 2 registered G-ACXI operated by Railway Air Services.

 

de Havilland D.H.86A Dragon Express registered G-ADVJ Ronaldsway of Blackpool and West Coast Air Services Ltd and Douglas DC-3 registered G-AGZB of British European Airways.

 

Vickers Viscount 701C G-ANHD of British European Airways and Britten-Norman Islander G-AXXH of Telair Manchester LTD; control tower at Ronaldsway Airport.

 

First Day Cover - de Havilland D.H.84 Dragon Mk 2 registered G-ACXI operated by Railway

Air Services. Cancel at Douglas, the capital and largest town of the Isle of Man.

 

First Day Cover - Cancel at Jurby Ramsey.

 

First Day Cover - Gutters Pairs; Cancels at Ramsey, the second largest town on the island after Douglas.

 

 

 

First Day Cover by Cotswold Covers – Raised printing.

First Day Cover by Cotswold Covers - Gutter pairs – Raised printing.

 

First  Day  Cover  by  Mercury  –  Colored  Raised  printing  -  de  Havilland  D.H.84  Dragon  Mk  2 registered G-ACXI operated by Railway Air Services:

Two errors: 1) The aircraft was operated by Railway Air Services and not United Air Services

Ltd., as indicated on the nose of the aircraft; 2) The aircraft registration is indicated as ACXI-G; the letter “G” indicating the country of registration (i.e. Great Britain in this case) should be in front of the mark.

Cachetmaker Mercury used a rather similar design for the Jersey issue of 24 July 1984. More information on this cover can be obtained by clicking on the following link: Jersey – Reverse Registration Number.

 

Benham Silk First Day Covers; the cachets reproduce the original hand-painted artwork by A.D. Theobald (mounted on 6”x4.5” boards), which was used to illustrate the stamps. The triskelion from the national flag adorns the four corners of the cachet. BENHAM (A. BUCKINGHAM) LTD. is the largest G.B. first day cover dealer in the U.K.

 

 

 

 

 

The Benham Silk cover with the 11-p stamp commemorated the actual date of the 50th anniversary of the railway Air Services to the Isle of Man, i.e. 20 August 1934, at Ronaldsway airport located in the south of the island near Castletown. Airmail blue label.

 

First Day Covers with Colorano Silk Cachet. The aircraft shown on the stamps are reproduced on the cachet. Some covers bear the cancel related to the 70th anniversary of the first British win of the Schneider Trophy  in 1914, with the date of the stamp issue (i.e. 27  April 1984); this cancel at Jurby shows a Sopwith Tabloid aircraft, the triskelion from the flag, and the Schneider Trophy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Day Cover commemorating the First Digital Schneider Trophy Race (70th Anniversary, 1914-1984).

Among the 1984 British Air-Racing calendar, the Digital Schneider Trophy Air Race was held on 23-24 June at Bembridge, Isle of Wight. Charles Howard Pixton (1885-1972) was the first British to win the Schneider Trophy in 1914.

Cancels are dated either 27 April 1984 (Date of stamp issue), or 23 June 1984 (First day of the Digital Schneider Trophy Air Race held in 1984).

 

 

The First Day Cover with silk cachet (Ramsilk No. 60) and raised printing shows the Sopwith Tabloid in a float-equipped version which won the Schneider Trophy in 1914; the race number 3 is painted on the tail.  The floatplane variant consequently became known as the Sopwith Schneider, of which 136 were built.

 

First Day Cover with silk cachet (Ramsilk No. 60), signed by Stella Pixton, daughter of Howard Pixton; limited edition with control number (107/125).

 

First Day Cover (Ramsilk No. 66), raised printing and silk cachet.

The Royal Aero Club of UK sponsored the major events  and organized the 1984 event of the Digital Schneider Trophy air race on 23-24 June at Bembridge (Isle of Wight) airfield  (start and finish), among  a calendar of various air  races.  The cancel at Jurby was reutilized on the latter dates to commemorate both events, i.e. the 70th anniversary of the first British win of the Schneider Trophy by Great Britain and the Digital Schneider Trophy held for the first time in 1984.

 

First Day Cover (silk), raised printing, Ramsilk No. 67, issued on JURBY DAY, which was held on 11-12 August 1984. Jurby was a disused airfield activated once a year for the annual air show named Jurby Day.  The annual JURBY DAY Air Show, organized by the Isle of Man Branch of the Royal Air Forces Association, came into being shortly after Howard Pixton’s death in 1972. Pixton was the Founder Member (Vice-President) of the Association. The Royal Air Forces Association, more often known as RAF Association, or simply RAFA, is a UK based charitable organization which provides care and support to serving and retired members of the "Royal Air Forces" (that is, Air Forces of the British Commonwealth) and their dependents.

The cachet pays tribute to the Supermarine Spitfire. The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries throughout the Second World War. The Supermarine Spitfire is unquestionably the world's most famous military fighter aircraft of WWII. The Spitfire is affectionately remembered as the symbol of the Battle of Britain. The truly remarkable design and engineering of this fighter gave the allied forces a much-needed advantage against the onslaught of the full force of the German Luftwaffe.

Reginald J. Mitchell, designer of the winning Supermarine Schneider Trophy entrants in 1925, 1927, 1929 and 1931, also designed the Supermarine Spitfire.

 

Maximum cards.

The aircraft registration on this maximum card is: G-ADDI (de Havilland DH-84 Dragon 2) and differs from the number shown on the stamp (G-ACXI). 

 

The aircraft registration on this maximum card is: G-ACZP (de Havilland DH.86B) and differs from the number shown on the stamp (G-ADVJ).

 

The aircraft registration on this maximum card is: G-AGJV (Douglas DC-3) and differs from the number shown on the stamp

(G-AGZB).

 

The aircraft registration on this maximum card is: G-AOYG (Vickers Viscount 806) and differs from the number shown on the stamp (G-APIM).

 

The aircraft registration on this maximum card is: G-AXXJ (Britten Norman BN-2A-26 Islander) and differs from the number shown on the stamp (G-AXXH).

 

Cover flown from Isle of Wight to Bristol on 20 August 1934 by Railway Air Services.

 

Cover flown from Douglas, Isle of Man on 20 August 1934 by Railway Air Services.

 

Cover autographed by Pilot M. Richards and flown on 20 August 1984 (i.e. actual date of the 50th anniversary of the Railway Air Services to the Isle of Man) from Isle of Man’s Ronaldsway Airport to Liverpool by Telair Britten-Norman BN-2A Islander aircraft registered G-AXWH; only 450 of these covers exist (limited edition).

 

Background: Several different inserts can found inside the covers related to the Schneider Trophy. More information on this Trophy can be found by clicking on the following link: Isle of Man - The Digital Schneider Trophy.

 

1)

 

 

 

2)

 

 

Reproduction of Pixton’s original Air Pilot  License  No. 50  granted  by the Royal Aero Club of Great Britain on 30 December 1910

 

3)

 

 

 

 

4) Description card.

 

5) Post cards with red borders (red color remembering the backgrounds of Pixtons’s crest and the national flag of the Isle of Man; see here-below): reproductions of Pixton’s Aviator’s Certificate (Air Pilot  License  No. 50  granted  by the Royal Aero Club of Great Britain on 30 December 1910) and ad announcing Sopwith’s biplane triumph.

 

 

 

 

 Charles Howard Pixton  (1885-1972)  was  an  early  British aviator; his later career involved flying the first newspapers to the Isle of Man and Pixton is reputed to have flown the first fare paying passengers, also to the Isle of  Man. He is buried at Jurby, Isle of Man. The crest seen on covers related to the Schneider Trophy (at the lower-right side below the cachet) is an adaptation of the Coat of Arms of the Pixton family.

Each corner of the cachet on the Benham covers shows the triskelion taken from the National Flag of the Isle of Man. A triskelion or triskele (both words are from Greek "τρισκέλιον" (triskelion) or "τρισκελής" (triskeles), "three-legged") is a symbol consisting of three bent human legs (or more generally three interlocked spirals) joined in such a way that the overall emblem has a threefold rotational symmetry, but no reflection symmetries; although it appears in many places and periods, it is especially characteristic of the Celtic art. The three-leg symbol is said to represent the three dynamic elements: water, air, and fire; others say that it symbolizes the Sun, the seat of Power and Life.

It is to be noted that, because Great Britain was the first country to issue postage stamps and the early issues were easy to identify (as they all bore the profile of Queen Victoria), the Universal Postal Union exempted Britain from the requirement that the country’s name must be part of every postage stamp issued. In return for this exemption, it has been a requirement that all British stamps include a representation of the reigning monarch as part of their design to designate the country of origin. In 1966, the photographic representation was replaced with a silhouette or cameo. Later, the size of the cameo was reduced, and it has remained small on all commemorative issues until now; in general, the queen’s cameo faces left, but occasionally it faces right.