​2010 Accomplishments

​Educational Forums/Outreach

  • 24 – 25 August 2010, CAAFI Environmental Team Workshop, Washington, DC. Agenda available on request.
  • 9 – 10 November 2010 Advanced Biofuels Markets, San Fancisco, CA, co-sponsors include Green Power Conferences and Biofuels Digest. Agenda includes session on Meeting the Challenge of Delivering the First Advanced BioJet Fuel to the Market.
  • U.S. Navy’s Pacific Command has established the Green Initiative for Fuels Transition Pacific (GIFTPAC) with a goal to displace 25% of the Department of Defence’s petroleum derived fuels with sustainable alternative fuels.
  • Airbus, British Airways and Cranfield University announced the formation of the Sustainable Use of Renewable Fuels (SURF) consortium to explore feasibility of offshore algae for jet fuel production at the Aviation and Environment Summit in Geneva. Rolls-Royce, Finnair, Gatwick Airport, and IATA are also founding members of the consortium;
    see: www.cranfield.ac.uk, www.airbus.com and www.greenaironline.comwww.airbus.com.
  • Sustainable Aviation Fuels Northwest (SAFN) project, a regional renewable jet fuel collaboration formed to assess four U.S. Pacific Northwest states—Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana—to determine biomass feedstock growth, harvest, refining and transport options in relation to sustainable aviation fuel production.
  • The Brazilian Alliance for Aviation Biofuels (Aliança Brasileira para Biocombustíveis de Aviação – ABRABA) was formed 6 May 2010. Initially the group is comprised of ten organizations: Algae Biotechnology, Amyris Brazil, the Brazilian Association of Jatropha Producers (Associação Brasileira dos Produtores de Pinhão Manso – ABPPM), the Brazilian Aerospace Industry Association (Associação das Indústrias Aeroespaciais do Brasil – AIAB), Azul Brazilian Airlines, Embraer, GOL Airlines, TAM Airlines, TRIP Airlines, and the Brazilian Sugarcane Industry Association (União da Indústria da Cana-de-Açúcar – UNICA). The objective of the alliance is to promote public and private initiatives that seek to develop and certify sustainable biofuels for aviation. The goal will be achieved through dialogues with those who form public policies, as well as opinion makers, in order to obtain biofuels that are just as safe and cost efficient as petroleum derivatives.

​Policies, Methods and Processes

  • Sustainable Bioenergy Research Project (SBRP) launched to demonstrate the commercial viability of using integrated saltwater agriculture to provide biofuels for aviation.
  • Work initiated by British Airways and Solena Group to establish a European sustainable jet fuel plant derived from waste biomass to power part of the BA fleet.
  • The Defense Logistics Agency’s Defense Energy Support Center (DESC) and Air Transport Association of America, Inc., (ATA) signed an agreement to encourage the development and deployment of commercially viable, environmentally friendly, alternative aviation fuels. The intent of the strategic alliance is to use their combined purchasing power to attract alternative fuel suppliers to the aviation market.
  • Rentech and United airlines conducted a successful validation flight using a 40/60 mix of synthetic jet fuel with conventional Jet A fuel in one of two engines on an Airbus 319 aircraft.
  • Lufthansa announced plans to use biofuels on some scheduled operations within two years.
  • Brazilian Alliance for Aviation Biofuels (Aliança Brasileira para Biocombustíveis de Aviação –
    ABRABA) was formed to promote public and private initiatives that seek to develop and certify sustainable biofuels for aviation. Ten organizations that include feedstock producers, biofuel producers, air carriers, and the Brazilian aerospace industry form the alliance.
  • Commercial quantities of jatropha oil from plants grown in Java have been delivered to Australia for processing into jet fuel.
  • January 2011 researchers in petro chemistry from Romania and other aviation stakeholders such as OMV, Air BP will launch a 30 months project coordinated by the CATE Centre from Manchester on the opportunities to obtain sustainable alternative fuels from camelina.
  • Researchers from the University of Southern California have developed a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for combustion of alternative jet fuel blends and have validated the mechanism against fundamental experimental data. This mechanism has led to more accurate predictions of flame propagation, flame extinction, and NOx emissions.
  • To accelerate research and development of algae-based aviation biofuels, Boeing opened a joint research Laboratory in Qingdao with a Chinese government research institute and may expand the effort to other labs.
  • The US Government passed the Algae-Based Renewable Fuel Promotion Action, which would expand the definition of cellulosic biofuels to include algae-based biofuels for purpose of the biofuels producer tax credit and other incentives; see:
  • The US Federal Aviation Administration with the US Department of Agriculture are working to assess availability of different kinds of feedstocks that could be processed by bio-refineries to produce jet fuels. To meet the Renewable Fuels Standard goal of producing 36 billion gallons of biofuel by 2022, construction will begin 2011 of bio-refineries or bioenergy plants in five regions serviced by Biomass Research Centers; see:
  • The US Department of Transportation’s Volpe Center has released a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) soliciting proposals on various areas related to Aviation Alternative Fuels — including future fuels, fuel quality assurance, sustainability and engine durability testing.
  • ICAO 37th Assembly Meeting in September 2010.
    • Programme for sustainable alternative fuels for aviation is presented for consideration.
  • The German Biomass Research Center has conducted a study to analyze the current default values for GHGs from rapeseed-based biodiesel, and to outline areas that would improve current GHG levels.

​Tests and Demonstrations

  • United Airlines flew an Airbus A319 with one engine using a 60% jet fuel and 40% natural gas F-T fuel on 22 April 2010.
  • US Navy flew an F/A-18 Super Hornet strike fighter jet at supersonic speeds fuelled with a 50/50 blend of jet fuel and a camelina-based biofuel on 22 April 2010.
  • US Air Force flew an A-10C Thunderbolt on a 50/50 blend of conventional jet fuel and a camelina-based biofuel on 4 April 2010.
  • US Air Force flew a C-17 Globemaster III on a blend of conventional jet fuel (50%), HRJ (25%), and FT (25%) on 27 August 2010.US Air Force flew a C-17 Globemaster III on a blend of conventional jet fuel (50%), HRJ (25%), and FT (25%) on 27 August 2010.
  • South Africa's Sasol claims world’s first commercial aircraft flight to be fully fuelled with synthetic jet fuel. Sasol celebrated its 60th anniversary on 23 September 2010 with flights from Lanseria Airport near Johannesburg to Cape Town using 100 percent synthetic jet fuel produced from the company’s proprietary coal-to-liquid (CTL) process. See:
  • TAM Airlines conducted a successful experimental flight in Brazil using aviation biofuel produced from the oil of the Jatropha curcas. The flight took place on the afternoon of 22 November and involved an Airbus A320. The flight took off from Rio de Janeiro's international airport and flew in Brazilian air space over the Atlantic Ocean for 45 minutes.
  • The U.S. Navy flew a MH-60S Seahawk helicopter on a 50/50 biofuel blend using a fuel mixture made from camelina seed.
  • The U.S. Air Force conducted an alternative fuel test of the Global Hawk UAV drone on a 50-50 blend of jet fuel and alternative fuels.
  • The U.S. Air Force conducted an alternative fuel test of the F-15 Eagle, using Pratt & Whitney F117 engines, on a 50-50 blend of jet fuel and alternative fuels.
 
Return to Global Framework home